eCommerce Web Development: Mistakes Significantly Impacting Your Entrepreneurial Endeavors

The prospect of getting an eCommerce store developed is tempting, to say the least. Touted as the proverbial money-spinner, an eCommerce platform is fast becoming a crucial part of our shopping experience. As per reports, in the year 2013, around 40-41% percent of people had shopped online. The figure is well poised to touch 46% in the year 2017.

A Few Words About eCommerce Development

Development of eCommerce platforms is no walk in the park. Mistakes along the way can significantly impact your entrepreneurial fortunes. No amount of discount or sales can help you if you don’t have a user-friendly site or for that matter if your contact information is not easily visible. Here is a lowdown on the major eCommerce development mistakes that you should avoid at any cost.

A Few eCommerce Web Development Mistakes Ruining Your ROI

An efficient eCommerce Web Development Company will not commit these mistakes at any cost.

Mistake 1: You aren’t paying heed to the factors to be considered while selecting an eCommerce platform

Do you realize that even the most popular eCommerce platform like Shopify cannot really be chosen arbitrarily? The choice of the eCommerce platform is the most vital decision affecting the future of your eCommerce store. And, what exactly are the factors that need to be taken into account? The size of your inventory, payment methods and the projected number of customers are just a few attributes that should ideally govern your choice of the eCommerce platform.

Mistake 2: Coming Up with A Layout Which Does Not Evoke Enough Trust

It happens and happens often. The appearance of your site is critical to business growth. You simply cannot forget that your users are trusting you with their personal information (like name, address, and their credit information). Now, the digital world is no stranger to instances of data breaches and information hacks. Shoppers have become more cautious than ever as far as providing personal information is concerned. They will simply like to ignore an eCommerce site which does not inspire due confidence. Businesses should be prudent enough to view a website just like a customer. Have a good look at your own site. Would you have divulged your personal details to the site (created by you) if you were a customer? You’re committing a major mistake if you aren’t doing this.

Mistake 3: Not having enough payment options

This remains one of the major reasons why eCommerce stores end up losing customers. Why not facilitate user experience by including as many payment options? With payment services like Google Wallet, PayPal and Amazon you can let your shoppers pay with all the leading credit cards or electronic checks.

Mistake 4: Not Coming Up with a User-Friendly Layout

No matter how tempting it sounds, the inclusion of too many features on your website only goes on to hinder its loading speed. Aim for simplified navigation. Make sure you’re making your site as clutter-free as possible accommodating all the necessary information at the same time.

Ecommerce and Its Evolution Into Mobility

Ten years ago ecommerce was still a cool buzzword that everyone wanted to try, but at that early point it was largely limited to the Business-2-Business world. The use of personal computers, mobile phones and the internet was still experiencing its first period of growth, so the average person sitting in front of their behemoth CRT monitor hadn’t grasped the potential of the web quite yet.

It didn’t take long though. Soon dot.com companies selling anything from sock puppets to toothbrushes at unbelievably low prices were popping up all over the place. Beady eyed investors saw the potential in dot-coms: little overhead and massive profit. The credit industry chimed in with low interest rates and blanket application acceptances, knowing there was money to be made. Unfortunately and predictably, the house of cards fell. Dot-coms were collapsing by the dozens and investors saw billions of dollars seemingly evaporate into thin air within a very short period.

Since that dark period in the early history of ecommerce, there have been countless research studies conducted in an effort to answer the desperate whys and how’s being screamed from bankruptcy courts around the nation. By now we have all heard the answer explained in long winded speeches about boom and bust cycles etc. In the end the collapse of the dot.com bubble was the inevitable outcome of greed on a massive scale, more specifically, unchecked greed with few security protocols and no governing body.

The birth of the 1990’s brought a wider availability of personal computers and the internet, but the 21st century brought mobility to the internet. According to CTIA the Wireless Association, there were just over 109 million mobile phone users in the US in 2000, that’s 38% of the population. Of course at that point the smartphone was clunky and fairly unusable so few people owned one. Eight years later the number of mobile phone users more than doubled to 262 million, 85% of the population. Now the Neilson Company predicts by the end of 2011 at least 49% of Americans will have a smartphone and 51% will still be using their feature phone (out of the 96% of the population that uses a mobile device).

Between 2000 and 2011 there has been an about-face on the part of ecommerce. Security platforms have become more stable and widely used so trust has now been built. User interfaces evolved into dynamic places where visitors felt both stimulated to buy, yet secure in handing over credit information. Mary Meeker of Morgan Stanley has amalgamated data from Japan that shows online commerce and paid services accounted for a whopping 32% of mobile revenue in 2008. We all know technology progresses faster than the Roadrunner, and we are equally aware that Japan and China are usually the first to set trends in technology. That begs the question, has the west fully realized the potential of ecommerce yet? Or are we still remembering the chaos of the 90’s?

The same report by Mary Meeker, dubbed the Queen of the Internet by Baron’s magazine in 1998, shows North American and European nations use of ecommerce on a mobile platform accounts for less than 14% of mobile revenue (2008). Are we still scared? No, we are being gouged. North Americans have some of the highest mobile phone bills in the world. Canada in particular generates an average of $55 revenue per user per month; the US isn’t much better sitting at $48. India is the most fortunate; making the phone companies about $5 per user per month.

Mobile ecommerce is the future; there is no doubt about it. For the average North American the ability to buy almost anything with a smartphone is far too convenient to give up simply because our data plan sucks. We may not spend as much as the Japanese, but we sure know the value of ecommerce. Then again, as humans we are cursed with the innate habit of reacting to the here and now. The bill is out of sight, and therefore out of mind. We are also experts at rationalization. The value of using an internet fax service to send a document to a client via your smartphone far outweighs the value of physically delivering it. The flexibility and potential of the smartphone and ecommerce has placed a much higher value on time. What we choose to do with that time saved is the subject of a whole other article.

What Is Ecommerce and How Does It Affect You?

What is ecommerce? Ecommerce which stands for electronic commerce, is a form of conducting business over the Internet by using online transactions to buy and sell either products or services. The creation and development of electronic commerce is directly a result of the evolution and spread of the Internet. Over the years e-commerce has seen explosive growth and an even brighter future.

Initially, the lack of central authority to define rules and sanctions left some fearing that the Internet is unsafe for the development of commercial activities. Using the Internet for commercial purposes has long been rejected on these grounds. The goal of the major players involved with the development of the Internet in the 80s and 90s was to have free and open sharing of information. Widespread access to the Internet has completely changed all of that.

Over the years, the Internet has turned into a major platform for businesses to reach customers from all over the world and build upon their brand. As online security slowly began to improve, more and more people feel comfortable shopping online. Now the trend is so widespread that it’s hard to imagine anyone with access to the Internet not visiting and buying from an ecommerce website.

For a business, what is ecommerce?

In the beginning, only major businesses with huge budgets were able to develop ecommerce websites, because hiring a web designer costs a lot of money. Currently all of the major offline retailers have a presence online. Fortunately in recent years more and more small businesses are starting online stores as well, because the barrier to entry decreased dramatically due to the development of all-in-one ecommerce solutions. Now retail businesses both big and small are able to expose their products to millions of people on the Internet, which if marketed properly could dramatically increase profits for the business.

For a consumer, what is ecommerce?

In this new age of the Internet, nothing beats the convenience that e-commerce has brought people all over the world. Not only are they able to find just about anything their hearts desire online, they can also compare online retailers to find the best deal on the same product. Consumers are no longer limited to what’s available outside their doorstep, they have access to things halfway across the world. There is also no need to make a trip to a store, ecommerce allows consumers to buy anything they want 24 hours a day no matter where they are.